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Jim’s Australiana Spot – 2UE - October 16, 2016

Australia in the 30s - the Depression part 2

(Jim is in mourning   Octagonal died early yesterday aged 24 at Woodlands Stud)

So many of our Aussie habits come from the depression, people were resigned to their lot. • Soap saving • Keeping the dripping• Recycling building materials • Hand me downs • using nylons on washing line • lining shelves with old newspaper 

Questions  
1 If we had some pie we could have pie and peas ...
  If we had some peas
2 What's for dinner Mum? Bread and duck
  Under the table
3 The smoke goes up the chimney
  Just the same


Australia was already at ten per cent when the Wall Street crash in October 1929 signalled the beginning of a severe depression for the whole industrialised world.

After the crash unemployment in Australia more than doubled to twenty-one per cent in mid-1930, and reached its peak in mid-1932 when almost thirty-two per cent of Australians were out of work.

A contributing factor was the visit in 1930 by Sir Otto Niemeyer from the Bank of England who visited Australia to advise governments to implement a deflationary policy. Niemeyer contended that wages must be 'depressed' (i.e. cut) to make exports more competitive and to raise profits. Niemeyer advised savage cuts in all existing social services. More significantly Niemeyer demanded that Australia not default on her international loan obligations to Britain. This created great political differences and resulted in the Premier of New South Wales, Jack Lang, being dismissed when he refused to pay the loan obligations.

Some depression stories:        The Lunatic Bend Footy Club
                                             Jumping the rattler …. the ‘Catch 22’ of susso
                                             History of the Rabbitohs
                                             Chokos (I have lots of choko anecdotes!)

 

O for Octagonal      
        Jim Haynes

You hear blokes talk of champions, you see ’em come and go,
A real champ maybe comes along each twenty years or so.
I’ve read of Phar Lap and Carbine, those legends of the past,
And I saw Tulloch and Gunsynd and they were tough and fast,
Kingston Town was brilliant, so strong the mare Sunline,
But for true fighting spirit there was just one champ for mine!
No champion that ever strode the turf could make me feel
The way I felt about that gallant brown son of Zabeel.

O for Octagonal to be racing once again,
O for Octagonal, on him you could depend,
He never gave up trying, he’d stick right to the end,
O for Octagonal, he was the punter’s friend.

Derby Day in ’96, you should have heard the cheers,
From the biggest crowd the Randwick track had seen for thirty years.
With Saintly, Nothing Leica Dane, Filante, down the straight,
I won’t see another race like that, however long I wait.
It was true grit and courage that wore the others down,
His will to win that drove him on to take the triple crown.
His stamina unparalleled, his action was sublime,
Oh, what I’d give to see old Ocky race just one more time!

O for Octagonal to be racing once again,
O for Octagonal, on him you could depend,
He never gave up trying, he’d stick right to the end,
O for Octagonal, he was the punter’s friend.

 

Check out Stone the Crows Festival - held at Wagga Wagga - Every Easter

Listen to Jim at 10.30 am every Sunday on Radio 2UE Sydney - or afterwards on the podcast at 2ue.com

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